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1-264 To General John J. Pershing, June 21, 1928

1928
   
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Date: June 21, 1928



To General John J. Pershing

June 21, 1928 Fort Benning, Georgia

My dear General,

I saw in the paper yesterday that you had just returned from Europe and am writing to find out something of your plans for the summer, as I hope to have more of an opportunity to see and talk to you than I did last summer.

I am leaving here the 26th by motor for Washington. Will probably be there only a day or two. Then will either go up to see my mother in Pittsburgh or down to Virginia on a series of visits. In any event I will do both, but in which order I cannot say now. Most of August I expect to be in New England visiting some old friends from Vermont, then at Ethan Allen, and later at Gloucester, and then with Preston Brown1 and finally the latter part of August with Mrs. Russell on Naushon Island. Of course, all this is merely tentative, as I am not bound to any fixed dates. I had rather expected to sail for Europe on the Leviathan June 19th, but later decided I did not want to do this.

Hope you are in fine shape, and I am looking forward very much to seeing you in Washington.

Affectionately yours,

G. C. Marshall, Jr.

Document Copy Text Source: John J. Pershing Papers, General Correspondence, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Document Format: Author-typed letter signed.

1. Major General Preston Brown, commander of the First Corps Area, had been a friend of Marshall since 1910, at least. In his interview of April 4, 1957, Marshall observed that Brown “was famous not only for his efficiency and his vigor, but for his amusing comments which sometimes took the hide off. I had persuaded him to go to Leavenworth—he was very contemptuous of it. We had met together at one of these shoots at the great target range at Camp Perry in Ohio [August, 1910], and I enthused him with the idea of going there. And he put in for it. As he came out either one or two in the course, he did very well, and that marked the beginning of his great progression in the army, which eventually came out to command a division [Third] in the Meuse-Argonne battle.”

Recommended Citation: The Papers of George Catlett Marshall, ed. Larry I. Bland and Sharon Ritenour Stevens (Lexington, Va.: The George C. Marshall Foundation, 1981- ). Electronic version based on The Papers of George Catlett Marshall, vol. 1, “The Soldierly Spirit,” December 1880-June 1939 (Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1981), pp. 327-328.

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