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1-011 Report to Major Richard C. Marshall, June 11, 1901

1901
   
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press



Report to Major Richard C. Marshall

June 11, 1901 Lexington, Virginia

Report of the Superintendent of the Mess Hall.

Sir:-

I have the honor to submit the following report on the Mess Hall:

During the time I have had charge of the Mess Hall I have not found it necessary to make any definite complaint to the Quartermaster. On a few occasions I have found reason to call the attention of the head waiter to untidiness in the setting of the tables and any lack of neatness in the dress of the waiters.

The fare is an improvement on that of the last three years, and in my judgment is all that could be expected, except in the manner of cooking the meats. The meat itself appears to be of a good quality, but it seems to have been dried up in the cooking.

To the best of my knowledge, no serious breaches of discipline have so far occurred, and the few minor ones have been reported as far as possible.

The practice of carrying coffee, bread, etc., from the Mess Hall has been entirely broken up. I have no knowledge of any cases of this sort, either officially or unofficially, since it was especially forbidden.

Very respectfully,

Document Copy Text Source: Annual Report of the Superintendent, 1900-1901, Virginia Military Institute Library, Lexington, Virginia.

Document Type: Typed letter

1. Major Marshall (no relation to George) was a V.M.I. graduate (1898) and the acting commandant of cadets.

Recommended Citation: The Papers of George Catlett Marshall, ed. Larry I. Bland and Sharon Ritenour Stevens (Lexington, Va.: The George C. Marshall Foundation, 1981- ). Electronic version based on The Papers of George Catlett Marshall, vol. 1, “The Soldierly Spirit,” December 1880-June 1939 (Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1981), p. 16.

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Holding ID: 1-011

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